Best States For Children To Live

Best US states for children

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About The Research

It’s no secret that 2020 is probably one of the hardest years in US history. People are struggling with the devastating effects of the pandemic and there’s the uncertainty of the future following the US elections.

To help you answer the question above, we measured all U.S states in terms of 15 factors related to families and children to find out the best states for children to live in the U.S.

Our Findings

After carefully considering the factors, the final ranking of the best states and worst states for children to live in has been determined. The results are as follows:

5 best states for children
5 worst states for children

Data Analysis

After researching and comparing 15 factors affecting the living standards of children, we came up with the total score of each U.S state.

This table only displays the Top 10 Best Living States For Children. If you want to read full data, click here.

(Due to the limited data gathered, the following states were not included in the ranking: District of Columbia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, North Dakota, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Wyoming.)

15 factors were divided into 3 main categories including:
- Family Conditions
- Social Conditions
- Education Conditions
See the scores of the top 10 best states by categories below

Family Conditions

Factors: Marriage rate, Divorce rate, Unemployment rate of parents, Number of low-income families, and the number of children who need foster care.

States Divorce/Marriage Unemployment Rate Low Income Families Foster Care Need
New Jersey
0.2
2
1.4
0.1
Massachusetts
0.9
0
0.3
0.1
New York
1.6
2
3.1
0.2
Connecticut
0.2
4
1.4
0
New Hampshire
1.4
0
0
0
Maryland
0.6
4
1
0
Pennsylvania
0.3
4
2.4
0.2
Wisconsin
0.2
2.8
0
0.1
Illinois
0.3
2
2.8
0.2
Nebraska
0.7
0
3.4
0

Social Conditions

Factors: Public assistance, Children without good health and health insurance, Children with mental problems, Teen deaths by accidents/suicide/homicide, Children living in an unsafe community, Children with drug and alcohol abuse, and the Maltreatment rate.

States Public Assistance Need No Good Health No Health Insurance Mental Problems Teen Deaths Unsafe Living Community Alcohol & Drug Abuse Maltreatment
New Jersey
0.1
0.1
3
4
0
3
0
3
Massachusetts
0.2
0.1
0
6
0
2
3.3
3.3
New York
0.4
0.2
1
4
0.3
5
0
1.3
Connecticut
0.1
0
2
7.3
0.3
2
3.3
5.7
New Hampshire
0
0
2
8
2.6
0
3.3
7.9
Maryland
0.1
0
2
5.3
2.4
4
0
4.4
Pennsylvania
0.4
0.2
3
6
2.6
1
0
5.6
Wisconsin
0.2
0.1
3
4.7
2.2
2
3.3
8.6
Illinois
0.4
0.2
2
5.3
2.6
3
3.3
7.9
Nebraska
0.1
0
4
2.7
3.4
1
3.3
10.8

Education Conditions

Factors: Proportion of children not in school and those who did not graduate high school on time.

States Not-in-school Children Not Graduate High School On Time
New Jersey
3
0
Massachusetts
4
1.3
New York
4.3
3.9
Connecticut
2.8
1.3
New Hampshire
5.3
0.9
Maryland
6.4
1.7
Pennsylvania
6.8
2.2
Wisconsin
7.7
0.4
Illinois
5.1
2.2
Nebraska
7.2
0.9

Methodology

After testing 15 factors affecting the living standards of children, we standardized the results to find the overall score. All factors have been evenly ranked from 0 to 10. The lowest possible score is 0 while the highest possible score is 10.

Because all the ranking factors were negative to children’s life, the state with the highest score was considered to be the least worth-living state for children. In contrast, the state with the lowest score was deemed to be the most worth-living state for children.

The formula: Score (i)=10 . ( ( (x(i) – x (min) ) / ( (x(max) – x(min) ) )

Metrics

Children living in a family without a mother or father may experience less happiness compared with others. This is why we took this factor into account when we did the research.
saving
When parents have no jobs or they earn very little, they may experience difficulties meeting their kids’ needs.
We want to find out how supportive the officials were about the children in their states.
foster care
We considered the number of children who were not in excellent health conditions. Those who didn’t have health insurances to treat their illnesses were considered as well.
These two factors may help determine the cause of mental health problems in children. They may also help determine if such problems last and if they contribute to teen deaths.
Mental Problem
community
Safety is a critical issue when it comes to kids’ living conditions. They should be able to live in a place where they feel safe and comfortable.
This takes into account those children who live with their parents and enjoy their support but still ended up abusing alcohol and drugs.
alcohol
school

This factor considered the children who have no chance of being at school or even attend kindergarten classes at age 3.

This factor determined children who were able to attend school but fail to graduate high school on time.

Fair Use Statement

If you know someone who could benefit from our findings, feel free to share this project with them. The graphics and content are available for noncommercial reuse. All we ask is that you link back to this page so that readers get all the necessary information and we receive proper credit.

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